Village News – August 2017

Kingston Notes

Heavens! Ascot and Wimbledon have been and gone and already I’ve noticed the evenings are dark a little earlier than two or three weeks ago. All through the winter I look forward to the spring and summer and then they are here and then they are gone and it’s back to short dim days and iffy weather. I definitely have a thing about sunlight – or maybe daylight and the lack of it – technically called SAD and standing for seasonal affective disorder it certainly makes me feel sad as soon as autumn approaches. To give autumn its due it does have some good points – the colours of the leaves as they change from greens to red and golds and browns, the smell of bonfires and frosty mornings and so on but as its still just about July I’m not going to think about autumn for at least another month or two and concentrate on what’s left of the summer!

When I was little – and that’s quite a long time ago – Encombe Fête was held every other year. I’m not quite sure why – maybe it was an after the war thing. Anyway, all the village got involved and it was quite an event. Daphne Scott opened the house to visitors and encouraged everyone with their stalls etc. by donating to each one and then on the day going round and buying it all back! It was a lovely happy day in idyllic surroundings and the weather co-operated by always being dry and sunny!

A few years ago, George Pitman told me that he had been reading up on Encombe Fête in the 1920s when Eric Scott lived at Encombe and apparently after the fête the lake was lit up and the villagers danced to the village band. It’s all changed rather a lot over the years and the sale of Encombe House meant that the fête has now ended up as Kingston Fête held around the Church – probably not the best place for a fete! Over the years it has got harder and harder to run as people have moved or died or just got older or lost interest.

We were hoping to hold another fête this year but the lack of support generally is making it quite a difficult task! The future of Kingston Church is quite uncertain at the moment but, whatever happens to it, I am pretty sure the building will still need maintaining and repairing and heating and so on and to do that money has to be found each year from various fund raising events! Whether you are a church goer or not it is quite often a useful building with people round about for weddings funerals and christenings!

There have been two weddings this month in the church and also a funeral. George Pitman who lived with his wife Rosemary at the Old Post Office for many years and who was very much involved with the church – and the village generally, died this month. He was a lovely man who for a long time wrote the Kingston Notes for the Dubber and did them much better than anything I could achieve. He always managed to find some personal bits of news about people living in the village and as he had been a headmaster for many years his notes were very well written indeed. He will be very missed not only by his family but by all the people who knew him and loving thoughts go to Rosemary and the family at such a sad time.

On Sunday, the ladies from NADFAS came to the church to talk about the work they had been doing for some years refurbishing the altar frontals and we served teas and Roderick played some music and although all sorts of other things were going on locally quite a nice few people came into the church to have tea and look at the display. Thank you to everyone who helped.

It’s always interesting talking to visitors to the church – one visitor told me that he lived on the Isle of Wight but that his family – the Grant family – were local to the area – in fact one of them had their name on the role of honour in the church. It is so nice that people can trace their families back like this. And finally thank you to Hubert Beavis who phoned to tell me that he can remember picking butterfly orchids for his mother too – rather proves something doesn’t it – that when we were all picking armfuls of the things back they came every year!

And a final finally – this little poem for all the walkers I see walking along the hills not really looking at the amazing views and looking rather grim. It’s called The Rambler and it goes like this:

See the happy walker – he doesn’t give a damn he’s got his compass and his boots, – he’s never in a jam.

See the happy walker – he’s got his haversack it’s filled with useful odds and ends – hanging on his back.

See the happy walker – he’s out in wind and rain he grits his teeth and marches on – he looks like he’s in pain.

See the happy walker – so keen to ramble on he’s forgotten what he’s walking for – Just going, going, gone!

And that’s just what I’m going to do. Happy August

Susan Ireland

Village News – July 2017

Church Stall

We are having a stall in aid of Kingston Church at the Kingston Country Fair Air Ambulance Fête on Sunday, 9 July and are intending to sell Bric-a-Brac, books, plants, etc. to raise funds. If anyone has anything that might sell and wish to donate please contact either Doreen Farr on 07506235038 or Judy Robson on 07541215500 and we will be happy to collect donations.

Also on Sunday, 16 July we are serving cream teas in the Church with accompanying music. Please come along if you are able to. We look forward to welcoming you to the Church.

Doreen Farr

Kingston Notes

Last month’s Kingston Notes were so late being written that I missed the deadline. So, in an effort to break the habit of a lifetime which is being perpetually late for everything, I thought I’d make a start on this quite early in June – it is now the 21st and the notes are due in on Friday, 23rd – what can possibly go wrong?

A friend once told me that being late is graceless. My excuse is that I was born two weeks late and so have been tarred with that late brush for eternity or at least until I depart my graceless existence.

Anyway, Spring rapidly turned into Summer and my naughty escapologist lady cat unexpectedly gave birth to three kittens two weeks ago – all very sweet and mole-like. Besides that, the hot summer weather resulted in sightings of the great white British male in all his bare-chested and often saggy stomached glory. Next it will be the socks and sandal brigade – the British have such great elan.

On a more serious note – the warm weather has encouraged a few random butterflies into my garden which made me quite excited. Years ago, my parents garden was covered in all types of butterfly but now even seeing one is turning into a rare event. A bit like all the orchids that used to grow abundantly in the woods at Kingston; they are dying out I think. When I was a child, I am afraid to say, my brothers and I used to pick large bunches and take them home for my mother, the butterfly orchids smelt and looked beautiful and despite all our pickings they came back each year even more profusely. Butterfly orchids, bee orchids, those mauve ones and some other green variety – not great with names! Last year I found two butterfly orchids and this year so far I have seen not one. I wonder if it’s the climate, the change in the countryside itself, etc., etc. that has made them virtually die out or just that everyone stopped picking them. Answers on a postcard, please.

Last month’s request for news of the cuckoo resulted in one actual postcard – thank you Mrs Cole – who told me she had heard the cuckoo twice at Arne this year. My request for any bits of Kingston news resulted in nil so consequently I have waffled!

The date for the showing of the refurbished altar frontals is now set for 16 July in the Church with music, by Roderick, and teas and the ladies of NADFAS who undertook the work. They will be bringing some photos to show how the work progressed etc.; it would be lovely if a few people came and looked and chatted with them (I’m not sure of the times but probably about 1pm till 5pm).

Another date for the diary is 2 September when we will be holding a small Fête in the Church grounds to raise funds for the repairs to the Church and for a local charity probably linked to helping people with cancer. You know what is coming next; I will surprise you and leave asking for help until next month and also don’t forget the Air Ambulance Summer Fayre which is on 9 July; The Air Ambulance does such great work so lots of support please from everyone to raise funds for them.

On a more serious note – I am sure you will all have heard by now that Gaynor, our Vicar, will be leaving us to go and work in Wales in August. I am not entirely sure what will happen next but there is a meeting next week and after that we will know a little more. Gaynor arrived just in time to meet my mother a few times before her death and in the space of six years took three funeral services for my family (my mother, father and husband) which she did beautifully. Thank you, Gaynor.

Finally, ‘get well soon’ and a virtual hug from me, for Diane Cole who has been in the wars recently and is feeling a little bit miserable, here is one of my mum’s favourite little poems to cheer you up; it always made her laugh.

Untitled

He’d paid his debt to society; his sentence was over at last,

He collected his meagre belongings, and said goodbye to his past,

The bars clanged shut behind him as he stepped through the prison door,

“I’m free” he shouted “I’m free” – a little boy said “I’m four”!

Susan Ireland