Cricket Club

kingston cricket ground 1926

Kingston Cricket Ground, with pavillion, to the south of the village, on the site of the former Rope Factory

In his book ‘Odds and Ends from My Century’ (1992), Bob Dorey wrote:

Kingston had cricket teams. The Earl had his own team, including, of course, the Vicar, who had been a Cambridge Blue, and other local gentry; the Earl also took the four best of the village lads to play in his team.

 

There was also a village team. Twice during the summer they would play the Earl’s team, once “at home” for the Earl on his well kept pitch out on Steart Field (above “London Doors”) and once on the village pitch up in “Rope Walk” (a field at the top of South Street, … the site of a rope-making works in earlier times). Traditionally refreshments at half time were provided by the Earl, as was a roller to keep the pitches in good order.

 

As a young man, a little while after coming back from the war, I found myself Secretary trying to restart the Cricket Club. The Earl, and his Team, had gone; so had the roller.

Former Vicar, the Rev. F.S. Horan commented in his book ‘From the Crack of the Pistol’:

The Kingston Cricket Club was quite a going concern. A certain Ernest Hixson was Captain – a tricky left-hand bowler; and we had a redoubtable demon bowler in one of the Dorey family – Arthur. With a long run and a hop, skip and jump, he would deliver a ball calculated, on a rough village wicket, to strike terror into the most intrpid bastsman.

 

Ken Orchard (son of Charley Orchard and Mrs. Orchard the postmistress) was our champion heavy-weight slogger. He used to stride up to the wicket with his bat over his shoulder, a braod assured grin on his face – a Hercules, but for the leopard skin. Fielders fell back – he took his centre – and then with every ball bowled it was “six” or “out” with him. Ken certainly didn’t believe in slow cricket – he quickly brought any match to life. We had fixtures with most of the villages round and our Kingston boys generally gave a good account of themselves.

Match Reports

1922

KINGSTON v. CORFE CASTLE

Played at Kingston on Saturday, and won by Corfe Castle by 32 runs. Scores:- Corfe, 66 (Major Woodhouse 20, Dr. Drury, not out, 18); Kingston, 34 (Jeffs 12). Loxton bowled well for the home side, and Savage and Beath for Corfe.

Western Gazette, 25 August 1922

1925 – WAREHAM AND DISTRICT LEAGUE

KINGSTON v. CORFE CASTLE

Played at Kingston on Saturday, and resulted in an easy win for the home team by 79 runs. Batting first Corfe Castle made a bad start, and lost five wickets for 28 runs, the total reaching 84 (Colonel Strange 31). The home team made a good reply, the first wicket putting on 35 runs, and the Corfe total was passed with five wickets in hand, the total eventually reaching 163, the last wicket putting on 38 runs (G. Travers 41, Loxton 22, Hixson 20). For Kingston Hunt took four wickets for 18 and Hixson three for 18. The most successful bowler for Corfe was the Rev. F. Corfield, with five for 49.

Western Gazette, 24 July 1925

1931 – DIVISION I.

CORFE CASTLE DEFEATED BY KINGSTON

By 47 runs (33-80) Kingston beat Corfe Castle on the latter’s ground. G. Travers (3-8), C. Dorey (4-12), and E. Hixson (3-11) were responsible for Corfe’s dismissal, whilst the chief scorers for the winners were W. Stickland (21), K. Orchard (18), Travers (12), and F. Cooper (10). Five Corfe bowlers shared the wickets – Stockley (2-5), Fooks (3-23), D. Cooper (2-16), P. Crofts (2-20), and K. Greenstock (1-10).

Western Gazette, 3 July 1931

Page last updated: 20 February 2016

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