Montague ‘Mont’ Hooper (1867-1951) = Bessie Mabel Audley (1870-1953)

Mont & Bessie Hooper – Photo courtesy of Belinda Norman

Montague, known as ‘Mont’, was the son of Kingston born George Hooper and Adelaide Louis Hooper neé Squibb. Mont became a fisherman.

In 1890, Mont married Bessie Mabel Audley (1870-1953), the daughter of Thomas John Audley (1824-1895) and Sarah Audley nee Keats (1825-1873). Bessie was born on 28 April 1870 at Corfe Castle and was baptised there on 7 August 1870. By 1881 the Audley family were living at Scoles Gate Cottage. In 1887, Bessie had a daughter Harriet Susan Audley (1887-1981) who married Charles Hancock (1893-1971) in 1916. Harriet was known as ‘Doll‘.

In 1891, Bessie, Mont and Harriet were living with Bessie’s unmarried brother Frederick Audley at Worth. Later that year, Bessie gave birth to a daughter Florence, known later as ‘Floss‘. In 1900, Mont and Bess had a son who died soon after birth.

By 1901, Mont, Bessie and Floss were living in London Row, Worth Matravers.

Sale particulars in 1919 for multiple properties in Worth Matravers included No. 1 London Row and No. 2 London Row and stated:

“No. 2 is let to Mr. Mont. Hooper on lease expiring Michaelmas, 1934, at £3 10s. per annum. Tithe free”.

In January 1920, the S.S. Treveal was shipwrecked on the Kimmeridge Ledges and subsequently broke in two and sank. In total, 36 on board lost their lives with some 21 bodies being washed ashore. Mont Hooper and son-in-law Walter Welsh were soon on the scene and brought with them two women (one of whom was Miss May Welsh, Walter’s sister) who played a crucial role with artificial respiration of the numbed and nearly lifeless. Seven survivors in all were revived. Mont’s wife Bessie and daughter Floss laid out the dead on trestle tables in Worth Village Hall.

In September 1939, Mont and Bessie were still at No. 2 London Row – known as ‘Rosedale’. Mont was still a fisherman but was noted as being in the Observer Corps. Bessie’s first daughter Harriet Hancock (‘Doll’) was staying with them having separated from her husband Charles.

Mont died on 5 August 1951 aged 83 and Bessie died in 1953 also aged 83.

Children of Mont and Bessie:

1. Florence Mabel Hooper (1891–1968)

Florence was known either as ‘Flossie’ or more commonly ‘Floss’.

She became a school teacher at Worth and in 1916 married Walter John Welsh (1888-1944), son of Robert Stickland Welsh (1856-1913) and Jessie Louisa Welsh nee Stiles (1858-1950). Doll was one of her bridesmaids.

Extract from the Western Gazette – Friday 14 July 1916

WORTH MATRAVERS

SCHOOL TEACHER’S WEDDING: BRIDE’S TOUCHING TRIBUTE TO LATE VICAR:- The wedding was solemnised, at the Parish Church of St. Nicholas, of Flossie, youngest daughter of Mr. M. Hooper, of Worth, and Walter, second son of the late Mr. R. Welsh, of Corfe Castle. The officiating minister was the Rev. J. W. Coulter, of Langton Matravers. The bridesmaids were Miss Hooper (sister of the bride) and Miss Welsh (sister of the bridegroom) – their ornaments included gold brooches, and they carried pink bouquets, the gifts of the bridegroom. The bride was given away by her father; and Mr. W. Welsh, oldest brother of the bridegroom, acted as “best man.” After the ceremony a reception was held at the bride’s home, where a numerous party sat down to the breakfast. A tea was partaken of at the School-room by the parents and village children, this being provided by the kindness of the bride, who has been an assistant-teacher at the school for some 12 years. The wedding group was photographed on the Vicarage lawn by kind permission of the widow of the late Rev. J. Edwards, after which the bride placed her bouquet on the grave of the late Vicar – a sympathetic act which was much appreciated by the widow. The presents, which were numerous and useful, included a clock from employees of the munition works where the bridegroom works, and a similar gift to the bride from the head school-mistress (Miss Smith) and village school children.

In September 1939, Walter was a Munition Worker handling nitro glycerine. The family were living at Sunnyside (no. 6 London Row).

Son Gordon James H Welsh was born 23 August 1921. In 1939 Gordon was a Grocery & Provision Manager. The family ran F Welsh’s Store on Pike’s Lane at Worth.

F. Welsh Store – Photo courtesy of Jane Davarian

Floss was widowed in 1944 and she continued living at London Row with Doll. Floss died in 1968 and her ashes were interred at Worth. Doll died on 5 August 1981.

Floss and Doll – Photo courtesy of Belinda Norman

2. Harold Montague Audley Hooper (1900-1900)

Sadly Harold died very shortly after birth.


More about “Doll”

Bessie’s first daughter Harriet Susan Audley was born on 16 July 1887. As stated earlier, Bessie married Mont Hooper in 1890 and Harriet was often known by the surname Hooper and the forename Dorothy or Doll for short.

Doll told a neighbour, Douglas Sanders*, that when she was 12 (around 1899) she boarded a train to Guildford to become a between maid for a rich family in Guildford earning around £1 a month.

So far we have not been able to locate Doll in the 1901 census.

In 1911, as Dorothy Hooper, she was a house parlourmaid for Herbert Bradley J.P. at Hill Croft in Broadstone.

Doll then went to London in service.

In 1916, as Dorothy Hooper, she married Charles Hancock (1893-1971) at St. Stephen’s Church in Paddington with step-father Mont Hooper as a witness. Charles was born on 20 July 1893 at Bampton in Devon to postman Charles Hancock (1868-1946) & Jane Hancock nee Tarr (c.1864-1938).

Marriage of Charles Hancock and Dorothy Hooper as St. Stephen’s Church, Paddington on 4 September 1916

In 1911, Charles was a ‘railway servant’ boarding with a family at Cullompton in Devon. He later became a policeman and then joined the Royal Naval Air Service on 7 January 1916. He was shore-based at H.M.S. President II in Crystal Palace. He was just over 6 feet tall, with brown hair, blue eyes and fresh complexion. The RNAS and RFC (Royal Flying Corps) were amalgamated as the RAF on 1 April 1918. It is not known how long Charles served with them or whether he rejoined the police before turning his hand to building. Charles and Doll did not have any children.

On 11 November 1935, the then vicar of St. Stephens, Paddington, added the following sidenote to the original entry in the marriage register pictured above:

In Entry No. 360 col 2 for Dorothy Hooper read Harriet Susan Audley otherwise Dorothy Hooper, col 3 for 25 read 29, col 7 omit Montague Hooper and col 8 omit Fisherman. A Statutory Declaration as to the facts having been made by Bessie Mabel Hooper, mother of the woman married.

On 29 September 1939, Charles was recorded as a master builder and decorator living alone at 3 Hannington Road, Wandsworth. He was shown as married. Meanwhile, Doll, also shown as married, was living at No. 2 London Row, Worth with Mont and Bessie. It is not yet known which year Doll and Charles first separated or when their divorce was granted.

In 1948 Charles married Martha Sophia Cooper (1886-1970). In 1939 she was known as Sophia and was a military tailor also living in Wandsworth. Born on 10 January 1886, Sophia was some 18 months older than Doll and around 7 years older than Charles.

Sophia died in 1970 and Charles died in 1971. Doll outlived them both, dying on 5 August 1981 aged 94.

*Douglas Sanders contributed his memories of Doll to a book That’s the Way It Was by E.M. Wallace, 1986. Douglas clearly thought a lot of Doll as too did many in the village who visited her regularly. Douglas commented “her great gift was the ability to overcome all social barriers” and that “she was a person to remember and cherish.”

Page last updated: 28 June 2017

Robert Stickland Welsh (1856-1913) = Jessie Louisa Stiles (1858-1950)

Robert Stickland Welsh was born at Corfe Castle and was baptised on 18 January 1856. He was the son of Mary Ann Welsh (1831-1915) who married Robert Linnington (1837-1898) at Corfe Castle on 11 September 1861. Mary and husband Robert had ten children together, one of whom died in infancy.

Robert Stickland Welsh, a clay cutter, married Jessie Louisa Stiles (1858-1950) in 1881. Jessie was born at Devonport on 14 October 1858 to Royal Navy seaman James Stiles (1822-1890) and Louisa Stiles nee Edgcombe (1825-1910). By 1871, 12 year old Jessie was living with her parents and two sisters at West Mill Cottages, Corfe Castle. Ten years later, and still at West Mill, Jessie was now a dressmaker about to be married. After they married, Robert and Louisa continued living at West Mill Cottages and were still there in 1891. They had seven children in total.

The Welsh Family c.1903 – Photo courtesy of Jane Davarian

Back row, left to right: Magdalene May, William James, Bessie Mary, Walter John

Front row, left to right: Robert Strickland Welsh, Gladys Mabel, Jessie Louisa, Edward George, Jessie Louisa Welsh (nee Stiles)

By 1901 Robert and Louisa were living at Scoles Gate. Robert was shown as a ‘clay miner – underground’. By 1911, Robert had retired and Louisa was dressmaking.

Writing in his 1992 book “Odds and Ends from My Century”, Bob Dorey said:

Sometimes Cook (Mrs. Gould) would appear unexpectedly – “Go down to Scoles Gate and fetch me five dozen eggs from Mrs. Welsh’s. I’ll pickle them”.

I knew all the Welsh children, they went to Kingston school; four boys and four girls. A healthy and sturdy family, the boys all grew up either to enter the Police Force or the Services and the girls were all shapely and soon married; an achievement when you consider their father was an invalid, confined to his home for years, and Mrs. Welsh the breadwinner.

Robert died in October 1913. No infirmity was recorded on the 1911 census.

In 1939, Jessie was living at 5 London Row with her unmarried son William and other family members. Jessie died on 30 September 1950 and was buried at Worth.

Children of Robert & Jessie:

1. Jessie Louisa Welsh (1882-1937)

Jessie was baptised at Corfe Castle on 9 April 1882. In 1901 Jessie was a parlourmaid at Chilworth House in Hampshire. In 1911, ‘Louisa’ was a parlourmaid at Cattistock Lodge near Dorchester.

Jessie married George William Bugler (1882-1974) at Kingston on 8 April 1912. George was born at Hill Bottom to William Bugler (1853-1945) and Mary Louisa Bugler nee Grant (1853-1932). Jessie and George did not have any children. Jessie died in August 1937 aged 55 and was buried at Worth.

In 1939, widowed George was living with brother-in-law William Welsh and other Welsh family members at 5 London Row, Worth.

George died at the James Day Home, Swanage on 29 January 1974 and was also buried at Worth.

2. Bessie Mary Welsh (1884-1966)

Bessie was born at Corfe Castle on 26 January 1884 and baptised on 13 April 1884. In 1901, Bessie was a servant to Swanage butcher Frederick Vye and family.

In 1919, aged 35, she married George Speck (1889-). George was born on 15 February 1889 to Henry James Speck (1853-1934) and Harriet Jane Mary Louisa Speck nee Loveless (1857-1931).  In 1911, George was working in Bemerton, near Salisbury, as a wheelwright.

In 1939 Bessie and George were living in East Street, Corfe Castle with their two young sons, Robert Speck and Louis Speck. George was shown as a carpenter and joiner.

George died in 1960 aged 71 and Bessie in 1966 aged 81.

3. William James Welsh (1886-1957)

William was born 2 March 1886. He was a Policeman and served He joined the Metropolitan Police in London at the age of 20 on 14 May 1906. In 1911 he was stationed at Hackney. He retired on 17 May 1931 aged 45 after serving 25 years. At that time he was 5 feet 10 1/2 inches, fresh complexion, blue eyes and dark hair turning grey. In 1939 William was living at 5 London Row. William did not marry. He died on 6 April 1957. Probate was granted to his widowed sister Gladys Mabel Gillfillan.

4. Walter John Welsh (1888-1944)

Walter Welsh – Photo courtesy of Jane Davarian

Walter was born on 2 September 1888 at Corfe Castle and was baptised there on 4 November 1888.

In 1916, Walter married Florence Mabel Hooper (1891- ). ‘Floss’ was born 16 May 1891 to Montague ‘Mont’ Hooper and Bessie Mabel Hooper nee Audley.

Extract from the Western Gazette – Friday 14 July 1916

WORTH MATRAVERS

SCHOOL TEACHER’S WEDDING: BRIDE’S TOUCHING TRIBUTE TO LATE VICAR:- The wedding was solemnised, at the Parish Church of St. Nicholas, of Flossie, youngest daughter of Mr. M. Hooper, of Worth, and Walter, second son of the late Mr. R. Welsh, of Corfe Castle. The officiating minister was the Rev. J. W. Coulter, of Langton Matravers. The bridesmaids were Miss Hooper (sister of the bride) and Miss Welsh (sister of the bridegroom) – their ornaments included gold brooches, and they carried pink bouquets, the gifts of the bridegroom. The bride was given away by her father; and Mr. W. Welsh, oldest brother of the bridegroom, acted as “best man.” After the ceremony a reception was held at the bride’s home, where a numerous party sat down to the breakfast. A tea was partaken of at the School-room by the parents and village children, this being provided by the kindness of the bride, who has been an assistant-teacher at the school for some 12 years. The wedding group was photographed on the Vicarage lawn by kind permission of the widow of the late Rev. J. Edwards, after which the bride placed her bouquet on the grave of the late Vicar – a sympathetic act which was much appreciated by the widow. The presents, which were numerous and useful, included a clock from employees of the munition works where the bridegroom works, and a similar gift to the bride from the head school-mistress (Miss Smith) and village school children.

In January 1920, the S.S. Treveal was shipwrecked on the Kimmeridge Ledges and subsequently broke in two and sank. In total, 36 on board lost their lives with some 21 bodies being washed ashore. Walter Welsh and father-in-law Mont Hooper were soon on the scene and brought with them two women (one of whom was Miss May Welsh, Walter’s sister) who played a crucial role with artificial respiration of the numbed and nearly lifeless. Seven survivors in all were revived. Walter’s wife Floss and her mother Bessie Hooper laid out the dead on trestle tables in Worth Village Hall.

In September 1939, Walter was a Munition Worker handling nitro glycerine. The family were living at Sunnyside (no. 6 London Row).

Son Gordon James H Welsh (1921-2003) was born 23 August 1921. In 1939 he was a Grocery & Provision Manager. Gordon married Gladys Legg and had a son Brian. Gordon later married Patricia Audley.

The family ran the F Welsh Store on Pike’s Lane at Worth.

F Welsh Store – Photo courtesy of Jane Davarian

Walter died at Sunnyside on 20 April 1944 and was buried at Worth. Floss died in Berkshire in 1968 and her ashes were interred at Worth. Son Gordon died in 2003.

5. Magdalene May Welsh (1891-1964)

May was born on 17 May 1891.

In January 1920 May helped give artificial respiration to survivors of the S.S. Treveal disaster (see above).

In 1920, May married George Trevor Carroll (1897-1985). George was born on 24 April 1897 and was a farmer and agricultural contractor.

May and George had a son George Carroll (1929-2006) who is pictured later as a young boy with his cousin. George junior was born on 22 December 1929. George married Josephine and had two children, Robert and Jane.

6. Edward George Welsh (1894-1965) 

George Welsh – Photo courtesy of Jane Davarian

George was born 16 October 1893. George became a policeman.

George married Annie Ethel Jeanes (1897-1975) at Piddlehinton on 16 June 1920. Annie was born 28 February 1897.

George and Annie had a son Walter Edward Welsh (1925-1945). Walter was born on 6 April 1924. He worked for Dorchester Town Council before becoming a Flight Engineer in the RAF during the Second World War. Sadly he was killed on 4 March 1945 along with the pilot and two other crew members when the Halifax aircraft [NR179] they were in had returned from a bombing raid on Kamen in Germany but was unable to land back home as planned because of multiple attacks on UK airfields. They were running low on fuel when they came under attack by a German fighter. Control of the plane was  lost, the fuselage caught fire and the pilot gave the order to bale out. It took less than a minute from catching fire to crashing somewhere near Sutton-upon-Derwent. Three crew members managed to parachute to safety. Walter was buried at Melcombe Regis.

Walter Edward Welsh (right) and his cousin George Carroll – Photo courtesy of Jane Davarian

In September 1939, the family were living at Church Farm Cottage near Dorchester. George was then serving in the Police Reserve.

George died in 1965 and Annie died in 1975.

7. Gladys Mabel Welsh (1896-1984)

Gladys was born on 15 December 1896.

Gladys married James Gilfillan (1896-1950). James was born on 19 February 1896.

Gladys and James had a daughter Jessie May Gilfillan (1932-1939) born 19 February 1932 but who sadly died aged 7 on 3 August 1939 and was buried at Worth.

James died on 10 March 1950. Gladys died on 5 April 1984 aged 87. They are both buried at Worth.

Page last updated: 1 July 2017

Frederick Francis Audley (1868–1939) = Martha Ann Smith (1875–1956)

Frederick was the eighth child of Thomas John Audley and Sarah Audley nee Keats. He was baptised at Corfe Castle on 5 April 1868.

In 1881, at the age of 13, Frederick was already an agricultural labourer. The family were living at Scoles Gate Cottage.

By 1891, Frederick was a dairyman living at Worth Matravers. One brother and one sister, along with her daughter and husband, were living with him.

Frederick married Martha Ann Smith (1875–1956) on 24 April 1895.

Frederick and Martha had seven children, five boys (the first who died shortly after birth) and two girls.

In 1901, the family were living at 3 Acton Field, Langton Matravers.  Frederick was now a mason’s labourer. Martha had two young children. Martha’s parents, both in their late sixties, were living with them.

In 1911, all six living children were present, and Martha’s parents were now in their late seventies.

Frederick died in 1939 aged 71. Martha, who was still living at 3 Rosedale Cottages, Acton Field, died in 1956 aged 82.

Children of Frederick & Martha:

1. Frederick George Audley (1895-1895)

Frederick and Martha’s first son died shortly after birth. The fact that a child had died was not disclosed on the 1911 census.

2. Herbert Francis Audley (1896-1963)

Herbert was born at Langton Matravers on 27 October 1896. In 1911 he was a grocer’s errand boy. He married Elsie Clara Isabella Lock (1897-1980) in 1919. She was the daughter of Robert Lock and Annie Lock nee Sanders and was born at Church Knowle on 4 April 1897.

Herbert and Elsie had a son Frederick Robert Audley (1922-2008) born on 6 May 1922, and a daughter Nora, who married Charles.

In September 1939, the family were living at Raherne, Coombe Hill, Langton. Herbert was a journeyman baker and daughter Nora was a pottery shop assistant. Elsie’s father, a retired shepherd, was living with them.

Herbert died on 24 November 1963 aged 67 and Elsie continued living at Raherne, She died on 6 January 1980 aged 82.

3. William John Audley (1900-1929)

William was 5 feet 7 inches tall and he too was a baker. He enlisted on 6 August 1917 and served as a Private with the Ox & Bucks. He was demobilised on 24 February 1919. William did not marry and died in 1929 aged just 29.

4. Frederick George Audley (1902–1982)

Frederick was born on 28 July 1902. He married Harriet Ethel Hannah Crawford (1900-1981) in 1929. She was known as ‘Ethel‘.

Frederick and Ethel had four children:

  • Dennis George Audley (1931-2000) – married Jean and had one daughter – Dennis and Jean later divorced and Jean remarried
  • Gordon John Audley (1933-2010) –  married Kathleen Elsie Elvina Ball (1933-2008) in 1956 – did not have any children
  • Dorothy – married Mansel and had a son
  • Kathleen – married David and had a son and daughter

In September 1939, Frederick, Ethel and family were living at 4 Arundel Terrace, Langton. Frederick, who had been a butcher’s roundsman, was unemployed at the time.

Fredrick and Ethel later moved to 6 Capston Field, Langton. Ethel died in 1981 aged 81 and Frederick died on 13 March 1982 aged 79.

5. Sydney Charles Audley (1903-1967)

Sydney was born on 22 October 1903. He married Vera Gladys White (1906-1962) in 1925.

Sydney and Vera had six children:

  • Kenneth Gordon Audley (1926-1994) – married Patricia May Mcloughlin (1925-2003) and had two sons and two daughters
  • Brian – married Doris and had two daughters and a son – Brian and Doris divorced and both remarried, Brian to Jean and Doris to James
  • Pamela June Audley (1930-1977) – married Cyril Suttle (1930-2004) and had two daughters. Widowed Cyril later married Evelyn.
  • Patricia – married Gordon James H Welsh (1921-2003)
  • Raymond – married Margaret and had four sons
  • Marion – married Derek and had two sons and a daughter

Vera died in 1962 and, in 1965, widower Sydney married widow Dorothy Constance L Lovell nee Ford (1902-1995). After Sydney’s death in 1967, Dorothy married for a third time in 1968 to Nelson John Thompson (1905-1971).

6. Winifred Florence Audley (1907-1958)

Winifred was born on 4 July 1907. On 1 August 1932, she married carpenter Ernest Edward Dorey (1906-1980), the son of Kingston’s Edwin George Dorey (1875-1942) and Sarah Holland Dorey nee Stickland (1848-1919), at Langton Matravers.

Winifred and Ernest had one daughter, Joan Dorey (1933-2016). Joan, born on 4 February 1933, married Peter and they had two daughters. Joan died on 25 March 2016.

In September 1939, Winifred, Ernest and Joan were living at 2 Victoria Terrace, Jubilee Road, Swanage. Ernest was an Air Raid Precaution warden specialising in demolition and decontamination.

Winifred died on 10 May 1958 aged 50 and Ernest died on 6 February 1980 aged 73.

7. Gertrude Amy Audley (1910–1991)

Gertrude was born 22 May 1910. She married Gomer George Coles (1910-1966) in 1930. Gomer was born on 15 March 1910.

Gertrude and Gomer were living in Market Street, Nailsworth, Gloucestershire in 1939 with their three sons Stanley, Bernard and Kenneth. Gomer was an underground quarryman.

Gomer died in 1966 aged 56 and Gertrude died on 9 October 1991 in Stroud aged 81.

Page last updated: 1 July 2017

Frederick Charles Audley (1888-1940) = Kate Chapman (1885-1951)

Frederick Charles Audley was born at Kingston on 13 April 1888. He was the eldest of four children born to Henry James Audley and Alice Goodchild Audley nee Dorey.

Frederick married Kate Chapman (1885-1951) on 13 January 1912. Kate was born at Lydlinch to William Chapman and Mary Jane Chapman nee Ryall.

Kate Audley nee Chapman – Photo courtesy of Beryl Dean nee Audley

 

They lived at Scoles Farm

Scoles Farm – Photo courtesy of Beryl Dean nee Audley

and had six children:

1. Owen Vivian Audley (1912-1980)

Owen attended Kingston School and appeared in the 1922 school photo.

owen audley c1922

Owen Audley c.1922

In September 1939, Owen was recorded as a builders labourer and married living at Ashley, near Romsey, Hampshire, with wife Lily R Audley and five children. Owen and Lily, whose maiden surname was Heathman, had ten children but five are understood to have died shortly after birth.

Owen married Olga Doreen Dawson (1923-1994) in 1943 and they had one son. Owen was living at 96 Lincoln Gardens, Scunthorpe when he died in 1980.

2. Frederick Charles Audley (1914-1986)

dairyman Frederick married cook Rosina Lucy Bartlett (1915-1964) at Kingston on 14 September 1940 and they had two daughters Margaret and Beryl

fred audley at kingston

Fred Audley at Scoles Farm – Photograph courtesy of Belinda Norman

 

fred audley cropped2

Fred Audley with team of horses – Photograph courtesy of Belinda Norman

Extract from Corfe Castle Encyclopaedia by Rodney Legg, 2000:

‘Lynch Farm – on the lower slope of Kingston Hill … was the dairy for Corfe Castle until the mid-20th century. Fred Audley and his mare, Topsey, used to bring unpasteurised milk in an open cart daily to Corfe village, into the 1950s’.

Fred and Topsey were in the opening scene of the 1949 film, ‘Man On The Run’, which was shot in Corfe Castle.

3. Gertrude Alice Mary ‘Gertie’ Audley (1918-2008)

Gertrude was born on 20 February 1918. She attended Kingston School and is pictured in the 1922 school photo. In September 1939, she was working as a waitress at the restaurant at 14 Institute Road, Swanage and she shared the accommodation above with the restaurant proprietress and other restaurant staff. On 23 December 1939, Gertie married blacksmith Arthur William John Corben at Kingston and they moved to Malvern, Worcestershire where they had two sons, Arthur T Corben, who married and emigrated to the United States, and Richard Corben, who married and now lives in Worcester. Arthur senior died in 1963 and Gertie died in 2008.

4. Evelyn Rose Audley (1920-1979)

Evelyn was born at Scoles Farm on 3 December 1920. In September 1939, Evelyn was a shop assistant living with the Bennett family at 43a Station Road, Swanage. She married Wiltshire-born Arthur Graham Robinson in 1942 and they had one daughter Pauline G Robinson. The family lived in Wilton. Evelyn died in 1979 and Arthur died in 1992.

5. Douglas Roy Audley (1925-2002)

Doug Audley at Kingston School in the early 1930s

Doug was born at Scoles Farm on 23 March 1925. In 1939, aged just 14, he was working as a dairyman for his father at Scoles. Doug did not marry and died in 2002.

6. Clifford John ‘John’ Audley  (1928-2008)

John Audley at Kingston School in the early 1940s

John was born at Scoles Farm and married Violet and they had three children. The family lived at the Lodge on Kingston Hill.  John died in 2008 and his son Barry wrote and read the poem below at his funeral:

OUR DAD

Kingston born and bred,
Made only five foot seven to the top of his head.
Was in the Navy, loved the sea,
But was pulled back to farm life, as it was meant to be.
Two heart ops he had, we worried and waited,
But his strength and his will to live kept our family elated.
Seventy-nine years he lived his life,
Always there for anybody in strife.
Our Dad is special, what a man! How do I know?
Because you all will tell me so.

Henry James Audley (1865-1952) = Alice Goodchild Dorey (1863-1951)

Henry James Audley was born at Corfe Castle on 4 July 1865. He was the seventh child of Thomas John Audley and Sarah Audley nee Keats. He was baptised on 24 September 1865.

Henry married Alice Goodchild Dorey at Kingston on 28 June 1888. Henry was then a labourer living at the Brickyard at Lynch. He could not write. Alice was the daughter of John Dorey and Anne Dorey nee Goodchild. In 1881, Alice was  in service at Winkton near Christchurch. Henry and Alice had four children (see later).

In 1891, Henry and Alice were staying with Alice’s widowed father John Dorey and sister at Kingston. Henry was now a shepherd and their first two children had been born.

At the time of the 1901 census Alice and all four children were living at The Lane but Henry was absent visiting the Damen family at Slepe near Organford.

By 1911 Henry had learned to write as he completed the census return. Their eldest child and youngest child were living at home.

In September 1939, Henry and Alice were still living in The Lane. Henry, then aged 74 was a ‘general farm labourer’.

Sometime after his retirement, on a slow walk up Kingston Hill when returning from a visit to the Doctor’s surgery at Corfe, Henry recounted to a companion how, in his early days, he and his sheepdog Bright were driving the  sheep down Kingston Hill when they started turning and going back up the hill – when Henry got to the top he found Lord Eldon and his servants had come out of church and were surrounded by the sheep!

Alice died in May 1951 aged 87 and Henry died in October 1952 aged 88.

Children of Henry & Alice:

1. Frederick Charles Audley (1888-1940)

Frederick was born at Kingston. He married Kate Chapman (1885-1951) on 13 January 1912. They lived at Scoles Farm. Fred and Kate had six children.

>>Click here for much more information on this branch of the family<<

2. Jessie Louisa Audley (1889-1981)

Jessie was born at Kingston. She married Arthur Edward Cross (1890-1971) had two children:

  • Gwendolen Grace Cross (1914-1996) – Gwendolen married Ronald Langham Browne in 1949
  • Henry James Cross (1919-1944) – Henry married Constance Myra May Blake in 1942 but was killed aged just 24 while serving in Pakistan

3. Dennis John Audley (1893-1980)

Dennis was born in May 1893 at Kingston. He married Ellen Maud Fielding (1895-1972) and they had two children:

  • Alice Joan Audley (1919-1979) – Alice married Geoffrey Kynaston in 1946 and had two daughters and one son
  • Ethel F Audley (1930-?) – electoral rolls show Ethel was registered as living at various London hospitals in the 1950s which suggests she was in the nursing profession

On 29 September 1939, the family were living at Croydon and Dennis was serving as a Constable for the Metropolitan Police.

Ellen died in 1972 and Dennis died in 1980.

4.   Olive Grace Audley (1899-1983)

Olive was born at Kingston on 14 October 1899. She started at Kingston School on her third birthday. She was confirmed at Langton Matravers aged 14 on 24 March 1914. Olive married Leonard John Light (1898-1967).

Thomas John Audley (1824-1895) = Sarah Keats (1825-1873)

Thomas John Audley was baptised at Corfe Castle on 16 May 1824. He was the son of labourer Thomas Audley (1805-1880) and  Mary Ann Audley nee White (1801-1880). By 1841, Thomas was a shoemaker’s apprentice living with his family at Market Place, Corfe Castle.

On 29 July 1845, Thomas, then aged 21 and a cordwainer (shoemaker), married 19 year old Sarah Keats (1825-1873) at Corfe Castle. Sarah was baptised at Corfe Castle on 28 November 1825 and was the eldest child of James Keats (1804-1851) and Harriet Keats nee Day (1809-1879). In 1841, Sarah was a servant of Corfe Castle baker and grocer John Shitler in West Street.

Thomas and Sarah had ten children – five sons and five daughters (see below). In 1851, Thomas & Sarah, along with their second daughter, were living at East Street, Corfe Castle. In 1861, the family was still at East Street, with wife Sarah shown as a laundress, and with two sons present but two daughters absent. Ten years later they were back in Market Place with four sons and one daughter present.

Sarah died in May 1873 and is buried at Corfe Castle. By 1881, Thomas was living at Scoles Gate Cottage, Kingston with three sons and two daughters:

1881 at scoles

On 5 August 1884, Thomas (senior) was ordered at the County Petty Sessions at Wareham to send his child to school – this would have been Thomas (junior) then aged 12.

Sadly by 1891 Thomas (senior) was in the Union Workhouse at Wareham and he died there five years later in June 1895. He was buried at Corfe Castle.

Children of Thomas & Sarah:

1. Sarah Audley (1845-?)

Sarah went to London in service – in 1871 she was a housemaid in Princes Street, Hanover Square – on 27 February 1872 she married commercial traveller John William Hill at St James, Hatcham Park (now known as New Cross)

2. Harriet Audley (1849-1874)

Harriet also went to London in service and married Frederick Frances Banks at Islington on 25 September 1867 – Harriet and Frederick had two daughters, Morna Mabel Audley Banks and Ethel Sunny Audley Banks

3. John Audley (1857-1914)

John married Elizabeth Ann Bettles at all Saints, Clapham on 25 October 1885 – he became a Military Prison Warder in London and Dublin – John and Elizabeth had nine children, Constance Maud Audley, George William Audley, Edith Annie Audley, John Frederick Audley, Albert Edward Audley, Gertrude Helen Audley, Walter Audley, Beatrice Gwendoline Audley and  Reginald Herbert Audley (who died shortly after birth) – after retiring, John (senior) became a Factory Night Watchman

4. George Audley (1860-)

George was in service as a valet married Sarah Ann Sleeper at Hammersmith – George became publican of Talbot Inn, Quemerford, Calne, Wiltshire – in 1915 – he

5. Mary Susan Audley (1861-1861)

Mary died shortly after birth

6. Emily Susan Audley (1864-1887)

Emily married Thomas Major – they had two children – Sarah Audley Major and Mary Elizabeth Major together – sadly Sarah and both daughters died in 1887 – Thomas remarried

7. Henry James Audley (1865-1952)

Henry married Alice Goodchild Dorey and had four children: Frederick Charles Audley (1888-1940), Jessie Louisa Audley (1889-1981), Dennis John Audley (1893-1980) and Olive Grace Audley (1899-1983)

>>Click here for much more information on this branch of the family<<

8. Frederick Frances Audley (1868-1939)

Frederick married Martha Ann Smith (1875–1956) and had six children:  Herbert Francis Audley (1896-1963),  William John Audley (1900-1929),  Frederick George Audley (1902–1982),  Sydney Charles Audley (1903-1967), Winifred Florence Audley (1907-1958) and Gertrude Amy Audley (1910–1991)

>>Click here for much more information on this branch of the family<<

9. Bessie Mabel Audley (1870-1953)

In 1887, Bessie had a daughter Harriet Susan Audley (1887-1981). In 1890, Bessie married fisherman Montague ‘Mont’ Hooper (1867-1951). Bessie and Mont had a daughter Florence Mabel Hooper (1891–1968) and a son Harold Montague Audley Hooper (1900-1900)

>>Click here for much more information on this branch of the family<<

10. Thomas Charles Audley (1872-1895)

Gamekeeper Thomas married Susan Hooper (1873-1967) at Sidcup in Kent on 5 March 1901 – Susan was the sister of Mont Hooper – Thomas and Susan had a son Ralph Clifford Audley (1902-1978) who lived in Flintshire and was a groundsman. Ralph married Isabella Roberts and they had a daughter Jean who is married and living in Droitwich.

Page last updated: 26 June 2017

1914: April: Parish Magazine

Vicar: Arthur Napier

Collections

The amount of the March offertory made on behalf of the Bishop of Salisbury’s Fund under the new organisation of Church Finance amounted to £2 10s. 0d.

The Easter offering is always and everywhere regarded as a present from the Congregation to their Minister, so that if the latter be poor, those amongst whom he labours may contribute to his earthly needs; while if he already have enough, he may devote the offering to some objectwhich he has at heart. This year I propose to send what you of your generosity give me (on Easter Day) to help to build a Church for the use of the soldiers at Bulford, near Salisbury, who though five times as many as we are in Kingston have no place of worship, while we have two.

Services

There will be no Communion Service on the first Sunday of the month (April 5th), as there will be two on the following Sunday (Easter Day). As the children’s “Mercy Sunday” falls on Easter Day, it will be kept on the Sunday following. Good Friday – Morning Service with sermon at 11. Children’s Service (in new Church) at 2.45. ; Service of Song at 6.30. Easter Day – Holy Communion at 8; Choral Communion at 11.

N.B. – Will those who cannot make it convenient to remain for the entire service, kindly leave the Church during the singing of the collection hymn. Children’s Service at 3.

N.B. – Will those children who bring primroses or other flowers for the decoration of their Church please take them up to the Old Church by 10 o’clock.

Evening Prayer, Anthem and Sermon at 6.30

Confirmation

Mar 24.             At Langton, Olive Grace Audley

1914: March: Parish Magazine

Vicar: Arthur Napier

Band of Mercy

A most gratifying result crowned our first entry in the Children’s Competition between the four counties of Dorset, Somerset, Devon and Cornwall. The competition consisted of an essay to be written by any member (between the ages of 9 and 14 years) of each Band, upon the subject of animals. The four best essays were first chosen out of the different Bands of Mercy, and then these were compared and judged together. The result of this judgment was a win for Plympton (in Devonshire) and second place for Kingston, with a certificate of recommendation. Kingston’s chosen four were: Margaret Grant, May Speck, Olive Audley and Ralph Hunt.

The Concert

Owing to a domestic bereavement, neither Mrs. Napier nor I were able to be present at the Concert on Friday, February 20th, in aid of the Band funds, so I can only speak of it from hearsay, instead of from personal experience.

The day was unfortunately a wet one, but there were not many of the usual audience who were prevented from attending.

The Concert appears to have been an unqualified success, and a sum of £2 18s. 6d. was handed over to Bandmaster W. Hooper.

A very pleasing item in the Concert was the presentation to W. Hooper of a China dinner service by the choirmen and bandsmen on the occasion of his wedding, which took place on the following morning. Mr. W. Candy very kindly made the presentation in my absence.

Collections

The March Collection will be for the Bishop of Salisbury’s Fund, and will be taken on Sunday, March 22nd. I have not as yet been able to come to any decision as to the manner of making a house-to-house visit for this purpose (as was proposed in the paper sent to you all by Colonel Rolson), and so, for this time, at all events, we must ask the authorities to be content with a Church offering.

The amount (Morning Service only) received for and transmitted to the Church Army, February 22nd, was £1 10s.

Wedding

Feb. 21.            William Hooper and Margaret Elizabeth Beavis