Village News – August 2017

Kingston Notes

Heavens! Ascot and Wimbledon have been and gone and already I’ve noticed the evenings are dark a little earlier than two or three weeks ago. All through the winter I look forward to the spring and summer and then they are here and then they are gone and it’s back to short dim days and iffy weather. I definitely have a thing about sunlight – or maybe daylight and the lack of it – technically called SAD and standing for seasonal affective disorder it certainly makes me feel sad as soon as autumn approaches. To give autumn its due it does have some good points – the colours of the leaves as they change from greens to red and golds and browns, the smell of bonfires and frosty mornings and so on but as its still just about July I’m not going to think about autumn for at least another month or two and concentrate on what’s left of the summer!

When I was little – and that’s quite a long time ago – Encombe Fête was held every other year. I’m not quite sure why – maybe it was an after the war thing. Anyway, all the village got involved and it was quite an event. Daphne Scott opened the house to visitors and encouraged everyone with their stalls etc. by donating to each one and then on the day going round and buying it all back! It was a lovely happy day in idyllic surroundings and the weather co-operated by always being dry and sunny!

A few years ago, George Pitman told me that he had been reading up on Encombe Fête in the 1920s when Eric Scott lived at Encombe and apparently after the fête the lake was lit up and the villagers danced to the village band. It’s all changed rather a lot over the years and the sale of Encombe House meant that the fête has now ended up as Kingston Fête held around the Church – probably not the best place for a fete! Over the years it has got harder and harder to run as people have moved or died or just got older or lost interest.

We were hoping to hold another fête this year but the lack of support generally is making it quite a difficult task! The future of Kingston Church is quite uncertain at the moment but, whatever happens to it, I am pretty sure the building will still need maintaining and repairing and heating and so on and to do that money has to be found each year from various fund raising events! Whether you are a church goer or not it is quite often a useful building with people round about for weddings funerals and christenings!

There have been two weddings this month in the church and also a funeral. George Pitman who lived with his wife Rosemary at the Old Post Office for many years and who was very much involved with the church – and the village generally, died this month. He was a lovely man who for a long time wrote the Kingston Notes for the Dubber and did them much better than anything I could achieve. He always managed to find some personal bits of news about people living in the village and as he had been a headmaster for many years his notes were very well written indeed. He will be very missed not only by his family but by all the people who knew him and loving thoughts go to Rosemary and the family at such a sad time.

On Sunday, the ladies from NADFAS came to the church to talk about the work they had been doing for some years refurbishing the altar frontals and we served teas and Roderick played some music and although all sorts of other things were going on locally quite a nice few people came into the church to have tea and look at the display. Thank you to everyone who helped.

It’s always interesting talking to visitors to the church – one visitor told me that he lived on the Isle of Wight but that his family – the Grant family – were local to the area – in fact one of them had their name on the role of honour in the church. It is so nice that people can trace their families back like this. And finally thank you to Hubert Beavis who phoned to tell me that he can remember picking butterfly orchids for his mother too – rather proves something doesn’t it – that when we were all picking armfuls of the things back they came every year!

And a final finally – this little poem for all the walkers I see walking along the hills not really looking at the amazing views and looking rather grim. It’s called The Rambler and it goes like this:

See the happy walker – he doesn’t give a damn he’s got his compass and his boots, – he’s never in a jam.

See the happy walker – he’s got his haversack it’s filled with useful odds and ends – hanging on his back.

See the happy walker – he’s out in wind and rain he grits his teeth and marches on – he looks like he’s in pain.

See the happy walker – so keen to ramble on he’s forgotten what he’s walking for – Just going, going, gone!

And that’s just what I’m going to do. Happy August

Susan Ireland

1935: Fete in the Purbecks

FETE IN THE PURBECKS – EFFORT FOR KINGSTON VILLAGE FUNDS.

An unusual privilege – that of viewing the beautiful grounds of Encombe Manor –  was enjoyed by hundreds of villagers and visitors who attended a flower show and fete held there by kind permission of Sir Ernest Scott, K.C.M.G., M.V.O, on Thursday afternoon and evening. Fete attractions were scattered over the smooth lawns surrounding the delightful bright green lake at the rear of the house, and a small but excellent lot of entries for the flower show were exhibited in the quaint temple in the grounds round a magnificent bronze statue of a gladiator.  Glorious sunshine and an admirably organised programme made the occasion ideal. The effort was in aid of general parish funds and the flower show was the second annual.

The fete was opened by Sir Ernest, to whom sincere thanks were voiced. There was a variety of attractive side-shows and the general arrangements were supervised by Rev. F. S. Horan (vicar). Mr. W. E. Candy was hon. Treasurer, and the show was organised by Mr. N. Phillips, head gardener to Sir Ernest. Sir Herbert Cook, of Studland, was among those present, and his head gardener, Mr. F. C. Gibbons, judged the show exhibits. Commenting on their all-round excellence he said: “It is a much better show  than it was last year; it is at least twice as good.  I really do think that it will be a better show than that at Swanage in years to come.”

Organisers of the various departments of the fete were: – Side-shows, Mr. R. Dorey; gymkhana, Col. Muspratt; entertainments, Mrs. F. W. Pond of Swanage; refreshments, Mrs. Orchard (assisted by members of the Kingston W.I.). A folk dancing display was given under the direction of Miss Dawson, and there was Morris dancing under the leadership of Miss Dymand, of Langton Matravers. Many of the dancers had competed in winning teams in Albert Hall competitions. In the evening modern dancing took place of the lawn. The two entertainments arranged by Mrs. Pond of Swanage, and given voluntarily by the Everest Concert Party, were excellent. Selections were played by the Kingston and Corfe Castle Band, under the direction of Mr. W. Hooper, who gave their services.

There were frequent ‘buses from Corfe Castle and Swanage to Kingston, from where a special ‘bus service ran to Encombe along the steep and richly wooded slopes of the Purbecks, on top of which the beautiful village of Kingston stands.

Five hundred entrance tickets were sold and yet there were not enough for all. Besides these, Scouts, Guides, and children were admitted free.

 

FLOWER SHOW RESULTS.

Three vases of cut flowers – Mrs. W. Dorey, Mrs. A. Cooper, Mrs. C. Orchard. Cut flowers – Mrs. Tizzard, Mrs. W. Dorey, Mrs. Orchard. Sweet peas – Mrs. Orchard, Mrs. W. Dorey, Mrs. A. Cooper. Asters – Mrs. Orchard, Mrs. A. Dorey, Mrs. Tizzard. Stocks – D. Hunt. Window plant – Mrs. C. Hunt, D. Hunt, Mrs. W. Dorey.

Potatoes – J. Marsh, W. Dorey, W. Damer. Shallots – R. Beavis, J. Marsh, D. Hunt. Carrots – W. Tuck. Spring Onions – G. White, D. Hunt, G. Bartlett. Peas – Mrs. H. Hunt. Marrow – Mrs. J. Marsh. Runner beans – W. Dorey, P. Damer, D. Hunt.

Cooking apples – R. Beavis, W. Tuck, C. Brown.

Wild flowers – Miss I. Marsh, Miss G. Dorey, Miss Stickland.

Home-made jam – Miss Joyce, Mrs. A. Cooper, Miss K. Bullen. Plain cake – Mrs. W. Dorey, Mrs. C. Orchard, Mrs. A. Cooper. Fruit cake – Mrs. A. Cooper, Mrs. A. Dorey, Mrs. P. Damer. Jam sandwich – Mrs. A. Cooper, Mrs. W. Dorey. Collection of vegetables for special prize given by Mr. Gibbons – W. Dorey, J. Marsh, P. Damer.

OPEN CLASSES.

Runner beans – L. Stockley. Spring onions – G. Wright, Mrs. Stockley. Peas – 2, L. Stockley. Cucumbers – L. Stockley. Stocks – L. Stockley.

 

GYMKHANA FEATURES.

A gymkhana was admirably arranged by Colonel Muspratt of Swanage. Among the various amusing events were blowing up balloons (Miss Daphne Bankes was the winner in completion with many Scouts); balloon sticking; and sausage stakes.

There were two bowling competitions. A pig presented by Mr. Barnes of Afflington Farm, was won by a visitor at the farm. A ham given by Mr. Dicker, of Wareham, was secured by Miss Roupell, a visitor from Surrey. The skittles prize, a shoulder of mutton, presented by Mr. Budden, of Corfe Castle, went to Mr. Brain. Treasure “stakes” were arranged by Mrs. Hare.

Western Gazette, Friday 23 August 1935

1914: March: Parish Magazine

Vicar: Arthur Napier

Band of Mercy

A most gratifying result crowned our first entry in the Children’s Competition between the four counties of Dorset, Somerset, Devon and Cornwall. The competition consisted of an essay to be written by any member (between the ages of 9 and 14 years) of each Band, upon the subject of animals. The four best essays were first chosen out of the different Bands of Mercy, and then these were compared and judged together. The result of this judgment was a win for Plympton (in Devonshire) and second place for Kingston, with a certificate of recommendation. Kingston’s chosen four were: Margaret Grant, May Speck, Olive Audley and Ralph Hunt.

The Concert

Owing to a domestic bereavement, neither Mrs. Napier nor I were able to be present at the Concert on Friday, February 20th, in aid of the Band funds, so I can only speak of it from hearsay, instead of from personal experience.

The day was unfortunately a wet one, but there were not many of the usual audience who were prevented from attending.

The Concert appears to have been an unqualified success, and a sum of £2 18s. 6d. was handed over to Bandmaster W. Hooper.

A very pleasing item in the Concert was the presentation to W. Hooper of a China dinner service by the choirmen and bandsmen on the occasion of his wedding, which took place on the following morning. Mr. W. Candy very kindly made the presentation in my absence.

Collections

The March Collection will be for the Bishop of Salisbury’s Fund, and will be taken on Sunday, March 22nd. I have not as yet been able to come to any decision as to the manner of making a house-to-house visit for this purpose (as was proposed in the paper sent to you all by Colonel Rolson), and so, for this time, at all events, we must ask the authorities to be content with a Church offering.

The amount (Morning Service only) received for and transmitted to the Church Army, February 22nd, was £1 10s.

Wedding

Feb. 21.            William Hooper and Margaret Elizabeth Beavis