Village News – August 2017

Kingston Notes

Heavens! Ascot and Wimbledon have been and gone and already I’ve noticed the evenings are dark a little earlier than two or three weeks ago. All through the winter I look forward to the spring and summer and then they are here and then they are gone and it’s back to short dim days and iffy weather. I definitely have a thing about sunlight – or maybe daylight and the lack of it – technically called SAD and standing for seasonal affective disorder it certainly makes me feel sad as soon as autumn approaches. To give autumn its due it does have some good points – the colours of the leaves as they change from greens to red and golds and browns, the smell of bonfires and frosty mornings and so on but as its still just about July I’m not going to think about autumn for at least another month or two and concentrate on what’s left of the summer!

When I was little – and that’s quite a long time ago – Encombe Fête was held every other year. I’m not quite sure why – maybe it was an after the war thing. Anyway, all the village got involved and it was quite an event. Daphne Scott opened the house to visitors and encouraged everyone with their stalls etc. by donating to each one and then on the day going round and buying it all back! It was a lovely happy day in idyllic surroundings and the weather co-operated by always being dry and sunny!

A few years ago, George Pitman told me that he had been reading up on Encombe Fête in the 1920s when Eric Scott lived at Encombe and apparently after the fête the lake was lit up and the villagers danced to the village band. It’s all changed rather a lot over the years and the sale of Encombe House meant that the fête has now ended up as Kingston Fête held around the Church – probably not the best place for a fete! Over the years it has got harder and harder to run as people have moved or died or just got older or lost interest.

We were hoping to hold another fête this year but the lack of support generally is making it quite a difficult task! The future of Kingston Church is quite uncertain at the moment but, whatever happens to it, I am pretty sure the building will still need maintaining and repairing and heating and so on and to do that money has to be found each year from various fund raising events! Whether you are a church goer or not it is quite often a useful building with people round about for weddings funerals and christenings!

There have been two weddings this month in the church and also a funeral. George Pitman who lived with his wife Rosemary at the Old Post Office for many years and who was very much involved with the church – and the village generally, died this month. He was a lovely man who for a long time wrote the Kingston Notes for the Dubber and did them much better than anything I could achieve. He always managed to find some personal bits of news about people living in the village and as he had been a headmaster for many years his notes were very well written indeed. He will be very missed not only by his family but by all the people who knew him and loving thoughts go to Rosemary and the family at such a sad time.

On Sunday, the ladies from NADFAS came to the church to talk about the work they had been doing for some years refurbishing the altar frontals and we served teas and Roderick played some music and although all sorts of other things were going on locally quite a nice few people came into the church to have tea and look at the display. Thank you to everyone who helped.

It’s always interesting talking to visitors to the church – one visitor told me that he lived on the Isle of Wight but that his family – the Grant family – were local to the area – in fact one of them had their name on the role of honour in the church. It is so nice that people can trace their families back like this. And finally thank you to Hubert Beavis who phoned to tell me that he can remember picking butterfly orchids for his mother too – rather proves something doesn’t it – that when we were all picking armfuls of the things back they came every year!

And a final finally – this little poem for all the walkers I see walking along the hills not really looking at the amazing views and looking rather grim. It’s called The Rambler and it goes like this:

See the happy walker – he doesn’t give a damn he’s got his compass and his boots, – he’s never in a jam.

See the happy walker – he’s got his haversack it’s filled with useful odds and ends – hanging on his back.

See the happy walker – he’s out in wind and rain he grits his teeth and marches on – he looks like he’s in pain.

See the happy walker – so keen to ramble on he’s forgotten what he’s walking for – Just going, going, gone!

And that’s just what I’m going to do. Happy August

Susan Ireland

William Bugler (1853-1945) = Mary Louisa Grant (1853-1932)

William Bugler was baptised at Beaminster on 24 April 1853. His parents were Charles Bugler (1818-1902) and Elizabeth Bugler nee Barratt (1821-1904).

William was, from the ripe old age of 8, a Carter, later describing himself as a Farm foreman and by 1912 a Bailiff.

On 1873, William married Mary Louisa Grant at Winfrith Newburgh. Mary Louisa was born Louisa Grant and I do not know why she decided to change her name, possibly because her mother was also Louisa? She was baptised Louisa and appears as such in the 1861 census. From 1871 to 1911 she appears as Mary Louisa or Mary L.

By 1874 the family had moved to Langton Matravers where their first two children were born. They moved by 1877 to Hill Bottom where their next four children were born.

Between 1903 & 1907 the family moved to Lynch Farm Cottages, Kingston, where the family were living for the 1911 census.

Children of William & Mary Louisa

1. Charles Bugler (1874-1957)

Charles married Frances Mary Gould (1880-1950) at Kingston in 1903 and in 1911 they were living at Copse Cottage, Kingston with their children Kathleen Jessie Bugler & Arthur William Bugler.

2. Mary Louise Bugler (1876-1966)

Mary was always known as Poll and she married Edwin Corben (1876-1960) in 1897.

3. Christiana Bugler (1877-1951)

Christine married George Courtney (1866-1953) at Worth

Announcement of Christine & H marriage. Western Gazette 29 August 1902

4. Thomas Bugler (1880-)

Thomas married Mary Louisa Oliver from Wimborne in 1905 and in 1911 they were at Lynch Farm House, Kingston with children Christina Mary Bugler (1906-) and Kathleen May Bugler (1908-). 

>>Click here to see much more information on this branch of the family <<

5. George William Bugler (1882-1974)

George married Jessie Louisa Welsh at Kingston in 1912. Jessie was the daughter of Robert Stickland Welsh (1856-1913) and Jessie Louisa Welsh nee Stiles (1858-1950) .

6. Bessie Jane Bugler (1884-1968)

Bessie married Henry Gould (1884-1968) at Kingston in 1907 and they lived in Kingston for the rest of their lives, latterly at 2 South Street, opposite The Cross. Henry Gould was Frances Mary Gould’s brother. Henry and Bessie had five children, all born in Kingston: Frederick George Gould (1908-1979), William John Gould (1911-1911), Cyril Thomas Gould (1912-1981), Lennox Charles Gould (1922-1990) and Nellie Joan Gould (1927-1968).

>>Click here to see much more information on this branch of the family<<

With special thanks to Ivan Gould, great grandson of William & Mary Louisa Bugler

Page last updated: 5 July 2017

War Dead

World War One

A commemorative plaque to the men of the parish who gave their lives in the First World War can be found in the New Church of Kingston St. James. It starts:

IN GRATEFUL REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY IN THE GREAT WAR 1914-1919

The names inscribed are shown below, together with further information established about each serviceman killed where known:

Richard BYDDER

Richard St. George Bydder was a Master Mariner in the Mercantile Marine and died on 18 July 1920. He was the sister of Kingston school teacher Beatrice Allen nee Bydder.

Sidney COOK

No information located as yet.

Edwin COOPER

Possibly Edwin Herbert Cooper born at Kimmeridge.

George DAVIS

George Davis was a Corporal with the Royal Garrison Artillery 11th Seige Battery (service number 137061) who died on 1 November 1917. George is commemorated at Dozinghem Military Cemetery in Belgium (grave/memorial reference X11. D. 8.).

Harry FURMAGE

Henry James Furmage, known as ‘Harry’, was a Private with the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry), 100 Company (service number 14992) who died of wounds on 21 August 1916 in the Battle of the Somme. Harry is also commemorated on the war memorial at Corfe Castle. He was buried at Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt-L’Abbe, Somme, France (grave/memorial reference III. F. 23.).

Robert GRANT

Robert Grant was a Corporal with the Royal Garrison Artillery, 285th Siege Battery (service number 334335) who died on 25 March 1918 aged 23. Robert is commemorated at Faubourg D’Amiens Cemetery, Arras, Pas de Calais, France (grave/memorial reference VI. C. 25.). Robert was the son of Edward and Susan Grant, of Kingston, Corfe Castle, Dorset.

David HOOPER

David Hooper had served in the regular army with the Dorsetshire Regiment (service number 15705) and was discharged having completed both active and reserve service in 1910. He was called up in 1916 when the Military Service Act extended conscription to the ages of 18 – 40 years and then served as a Private with the Prince of Wales’s Leinster Regiment, 2nd Battalion (service number 5359). David was listed “Missing Presumed Dead” during the German offensive “Operation Michael” launched on 21 March 1918 in an attempt to regain areas of the Somme that they had lost earlier in the war. David died on 27 March 1918 aged 40. He is commemorated at Pozieres Cemetery, near Albert, Somme, France (memorial panel 78). David was the son of David Hooper and Emily Sarah Hooper nee White of West Street, Kingston, Corfe Castle, Dorset.

Charles LOVEL

No information located as yet.

James MEDD

James Medd was a Private with the Dorsetshire Regiment, 1st Battalion and also the Wiltshire Regiment, attd. 1st Battalion (service number 3/7850) who died 20 August 1916 in the Battle of the Somme. James is commemorated at Blighty Valley Cemetery, Authuile Wood, Somme, France (grave/memorial reference I. C. 3.).

Albert SPECK

Albert George Speck was a Gunner with the Royal Garrison Artillery, 112th Siege Battery (service number 55793) who died on 21 March 1918 aged 20. Albert is commemorated at Beaumetz Cross Roads Cemetery, Beaumetz-les-Cambrai, Pas de Calais, France (grave/memorial reference B. 11.). Albert was the son of Walter and Mary Speck, of West Hill, Kingston, Corfe Castle, Dorset.

Harry STEVENS

Harry was a Private with the Dorsetshire Regiment, 2nd Battalion (service number 27367) who died on 16 July 1917 aged 34. Harry is commemorated at Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, Iraq (grave/memorial reference XV. C. 11.). Harry was the son of the late John and Mary Stevens, of Eastington Farm, Swanage and husband of Daisy Stevens, of Blashenwell Farm, Corfe Castle, Dorset.

Frederick STICKLAND

Frederick John Stickland was a Private with the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, 6th Battalion (service number 29199) who died on 23 August 1917 aged 19. Frederick is commemorated at Tyne Cot Cemetery, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium (grave/memorial reference LXVI. H. 29.). Frederick was the son of Alice Mary Stickland, of Encombe, Kingston, Corfe Castle, Dorset, and the late Edward Stickland.

Henry TRAVERS

Henry Lawrance Travers was a Gunner with the Royal Garrison Artillery, 278th Siege Battery (service number 334312) who died on 30 May 1918 aged 26. Henry is commemorated at Pernois British Cemetery, Halloy-les-Pernois, Somme, France (grave/memorial reference I. E. 13.). Henry was the son of Mr. and Mrs. George Travers, of South Street, Kingston, Corfe Castle and husband of Ellen O. Travers, of Ladnoll Cottage, near Dorchester.





World War Two

Beneath the many body of the commemorative plaque dedicated to those who gave their lives in the First World War is the following simple inscription:

1939 – 1945

The names inscribed are shown below, together with further information established about each serviceman killed where known:

Ronald BEAVIS

Ronald Henry Beavis was a Sergeant with the Royal Engineers. He died in September 1943 and was buried at Kingston.

Henry KELLAWAY

Able Seaman Henry Charles Kellaway (service number P/JX 249485) was serving with H.M.S. President III., Royal Navy. Henry died on 13 August 1942 aged 28. Henry was the son of Charles Henry and Lilian Kellaway, of Kingston, Dorset and the husband of Kathleen May Kellaway. Henry is remembered with honour on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

Douglas John HIXSON

Douglas John ‘Jack’ Hixson (1920-1949) is believed to have been invalided during World War 2. He died at The Borough Sanitorium, Weymouth on 14 November 1949 aged 29. Jack was buried at Kingston on 19 November 1949.

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Message from Sarah Holland

Hi i was just wondering if any one could help me?

I am researching my family tree and it seems that all of my ancestors on my mother’s side lived in Corfe Castle and Kingston! I am stuck on my 5th great grandmother Sarah Tatchell, she was born abt 1785 and married in Kingston to a man called George Grant. I can’t find any infomation on her other than her maiden name was Tatchell, which is on the marriage certificate! I have found lots of “Tatchells” living in the area at that time but no Sarah that matches her age!

Any information would be great, thank you!

Sarah Holland
Wareham, Dorset

1914: December: Parish Magazine

Vicar: Arthur Napier

Church Services

I hope to have the usual Lantern Services on the first three Wednesdays in Advent, namely – December 2nd, 9th and 16th, at 7 p.m.

There will be no Mid-day Service of Communion on the third Sunday of the month, but two Celebrations on Christmas morning at 8 and 11. The collections on this day will be made for the Church of England Society for Waif and Stray Children.

Confirmation

The Lord Bishop of the Diocese held a Confirmation Service at Corfe Castle on Thursday, November 26th, at 3 o’clock. Three candidates were presented from Kingston: George Caines, Seymour Tatchell and Lillian Allen.

O.H.M.S

We have now, I am proud to say, twelve (in addition to E. J. Collins, at present a prisoner of war) connected directly or indirectly with our village who are serving with the Colours.

May God protect them and enable them to be a credit to their King, their Country and their village home:

William Cooper            Fred Bullen

Walter Hunt                  Robert Grant

James Medd                 Jesse Marsh

Robert Dorey                George Davis

Jack Caines                  Alan Travers

Parish Almanacs

These Almanacs for the New Year can be had after any of the Lantern Services in December.

Baptism

Nov. 15.            Mary Geraldine de Courcy Cooper

1914: March: Parish Magazine

Vicar: Arthur Napier

Band of Mercy

A most gratifying result crowned our first entry in the Children’s Competition between the four counties of Dorset, Somerset, Devon and Cornwall. The competition consisted of an essay to be written by any member (between the ages of 9 and 14 years) of each Band, upon the subject of animals. The four best essays were first chosen out of the different Bands of Mercy, and then these were compared and judged together. The result of this judgment was a win for Plympton (in Devonshire) and second place for Kingston, with a certificate of recommendation. Kingston’s chosen four were: Margaret Grant, May Speck, Olive Audley and Ralph Hunt.

The Concert

Owing to a domestic bereavement, neither Mrs. Napier nor I were able to be present at the Concert on Friday, February 20th, in aid of the Band funds, so I can only speak of it from hearsay, instead of from personal experience.

The day was unfortunately a wet one, but there were not many of the usual audience who were prevented from attending.

The Concert appears to have been an unqualified success, and a sum of £2 18s. 6d. was handed over to Bandmaster W. Hooper.

A very pleasing item in the Concert was the presentation to W. Hooper of a China dinner service by the choirmen and bandsmen on the occasion of his wedding, which took place on the following morning. Mr. W. Candy very kindly made the presentation in my absence.

Collections

The March Collection will be for the Bishop of Salisbury’s Fund, and will be taken on Sunday, March 22nd. I have not as yet been able to come to any decision as to the manner of making a house-to-house visit for this purpose (as was proposed in the paper sent to you all by Colonel Rolson), and so, for this time, at all events, we must ask the authorities to be content with a Church offering.

The amount (Morning Service only) received for and transmitted to the Church Army, February 22nd, was £1 10s.

Wedding

Feb. 21.            William Hooper and Margaret Elizabeth Beavis