Charles White (1861-1913) = Annie Jane Beaves (1870-1948)

Charles White (1861-1913) was the youngest child of William White (1822-1896) and Elizabeth Kingsbury White nee Fry (1827-1900). He was baptised at Bloxworth on 10 March 1861.

In 1871 Charles was a scholar at Kingston School. By 1881 he had become a carpenter journeyman.

On 21 May 1894 he married Jane Gerrard (1862-1894) at St. Paul’s Church, Poole. Jane had previously worked as a servant for Revd. Spencer Smith at Kingston New Vicarage before moving to Poole.

Less than two weeks after their wedding, Jane was dead. She was buried at Kingston on 7 June 1894.

Charles returned to the family home at Willwood, Kingston and continued living there after his parents died.

On 23 February 1903, Charles married Annie Jane Beaves (1870-1948) at Kingston. Annie was the daughter of Henry Beaves (1834-1903) and Mary Ann Beaves neé Gover (1839–1901) and she taught in the Sunday School at Kingston.

Charles and Annie had one son:

  • Gerald Claude White (1906–1984) – Gerald, a gardener, married Dorothy Kate Green (1912–1999) at Kingston on 26 February 1938. Gerald and Kitty had two children, Margaret and Kenneth, both born at Kingston.  The family later moved to Bransgore on the edge of the New Forest.

By 1911, Charles, Annie and son Gerald were living in South Street, Kingston. Charles died on 5 March 1912 but Annie survived him by 36 years just living long enough to see see her grandson Kenneth born.

Gerald served in Italy during World War 2 and while there he composed a poem about Kingston and the surrounding area. We are grateful to his daughter Margaret King neé White for giving us permission to reproduce it here.

↑Up to parents↑

Across to siblings:  |  George (1852-1899)  |  Harriet Deborah (1854-1947)  |   Edmund William (1859-1896)  |  Edmund William (1859-1896)

 

Tom Senneck (1879-1960)=Ann Jane Hooper (1885-1960)

Home | Families | Senneck | Senneck=Hooper


Tom Senneck was born at Middlebere, near Arne, Dorset on 21 October 1879. He was the son of Thomas Senneck (1840-1907) and his wife Amelia Senneck nee Vincent (1843-1886).

On 4 December 1915, at the age of 36, Tom, a peat cutter, enlisted with the Somerset Light Infantry. His height was recorded as 5′ 7″. He was placed on the Army Reserve List and mobilised on 14 April 1916. He served as a Private with the 1/8 Middlesex Regiment as part of the Expeditionary Force in France from 30 August 1916. Unfortunately he suffered a gun shot wound to his left arm and returned to England on 15 December 1916. Sadly his injury was such that he was deemed medically unfit for war service and he was discharged on 27 July 1917 with a weekly pension. He was later awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal. On discharge he was given one pound and a suit of plain clothes. He went to stay with his sister Amelia Julia Green nee Senneck and her husband Stephen Green at Blashenwell Dairy Farm, Kingston.

Tom married Ann Jane Hooper at Kingston on 12 February 1918. The officiating minister was Rev. Raymond Alured Bond. Ann’s father David Hooper and William Cooper were witnesses.

At age 15 in 1901, Ann Jane Hooper was a Domestic Servant living at home in West Street. In the 1911 census she was still living at home looking after her father as her mother had passed away in 1905.


Tom and Ann had two children:

  • Thomas Senneck (1918-1919) – Sadly, Thomas died in 1919 aged just 12 months.
  • Margaret Beavis nee Senneck (1920-2009) – Margaret, sometimes known as ‘Marm’, married Norman Robert Beavis at Kingston in 1959 and they had one son, Anthony. The family lived in Poole. 

In September 1939, Tom, a cow man, and Ann were living at Lynch Farm Cottage, Kingston. It appears they had three evacuees living with them including Lilian and Donald Smith.

For a time much interest was taken in Folk dancing. Miss Ruth Dawson came over from Langton Matravers to teach us. Several of the older people were beautiful dancers – George Hunt and Mrs. Senneck especially.

Rev. F. S. Horan

Ann and Tom both died in 1960 and their separate graves are on the south side of the new church.

Page last updated: 17 March 2021